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EXAM COACHING

EXAM COACHING

IELTS (INTERNATIONAL ENGLISH LANGUAGE TESTING SYSTEM):

IELTS is the short form for International English Language Testing System. It is for people who intend to study or work where English is the language of communication. IELTS measures test takers’ ability to communicate in English across all four language skills – listening, reading, writing and speaking. Since 1989, IELTS has been proven and trusted worldwide to provide a secure, global, authentic test which measures true to life ability to communicate in English. IELTS is the original four-skills English language test, with more than 500,000 IELTS test conducted every year. IELTS is owned by three reputable, international organizations. It has the highest quality control and security procedures. More than 6000 organizations, including many government departments and universities, rely on IELTS. The IELTS scoring system is recognized globally, giving you a truly international result. IELTS tests all four language skills – Listening, Reading, Writing and Speaking. The Speaking test is a face-to-face interview with a certified Examiner. It is interactive and as close to a real-life situation as a test can get.

You must complete four Modules: Listening, Reading, Writing and speaking to obtain an IELTS test report form. You are tested in Listening, Reading, Writing and Speaking. You have a choice between Academic and General Training in the Reading and Writing Modules. The total test time is two hours and 45 minutes. IELTS uses a unique nine point scoring system to measure and report test scores in a consistent manner – wherever and whenever the test is taken. This scoring system is internationally recognized

THE IELTS 9 BAND SCALE:

9 – Expert User – Has fully operational command of the language: appropriate, accurate and fluent with complete understanding.
8 – Very good user – Has fully operational command of the language with only occasional unsystemic inaccuracies and inappropriacies. Misunderstandings may occur in unfamiliar situations. Handles complex detailed argumentation well.
7 – Good user – Has operational command of the language, though with occasional inaccuracies, inappropriacies and misunderstandings in some situations. Generally handles complex language well and understands detailed reasoning.
6 – Competent user – Has generally effect command of the language despite some inaccuracies, inappropriacies and misunderstandings. Can use and understand fairly complex language, particularly in familiar situations.
5 – Modest user – Has partial command of the language, coping with overall meaning in most situations, though is likely to make mistakes. Should be able to handle basic communication in own field.
4 – Limited user – Basic competence is limited to familiar situation. Has frequent problems in understanding and expression. Is not able to use complex language.
3- Extremely limited user – Conveys and understands only general meaning in very familiar situations. Frequent breakdowns in communication occur.
2 – Intermittent user – No real communication is possible except for the most basic information using isolated words or short formulae in familiar situations and to meet immediate needs. Has great difficulty understanding spoken and written English.
1 – non user – Essentially has no ability to use the language beyond possibly a few isolated words.
0 – Did not attempt the test – No assessable information provided.

TOEFL (TEST OF ENGLISH AS FOREIGN LANAGUAGE):

Using the latest technology, the TOEFL iBT test is an Internet-Based Test (iBT) that measures a candidate’s ability to combine listening, reading, speaking and writing skills, making it the most comprehensive English-language proficiency test. With unmatched scoring procedures and security measures, the TOEFL test is the industry standard in English-language assessment.

  • Backed by over 4 decades of world-renowned research
  • Recognized by more than 7,000 individual institutions worldwide
  • The most widely available academic English-proficiency test in the world, with over 4,500 test centers in more than 165 countries

Available in 2 formats — Internet- and Paper-based — the TOEFL test is:

  • a highly reliable measure of English-language proficiency
  • validated by more than 40 years of world-class, scholarly research
  • built to the highest psychometric standards

The TOEFL iBT test contains 100% academic content created by working with institutions to identify the English-language demands international students’ face.
It simulates actual tasks from classrooms — from comprehending a lecture to participating in discussions and extracurricular activities.
Our researchers recorded examples of classroom teaching, study groups and student interactions at several institutions. They collected textbooks and packets from students’ courses and compiled their findings into a language database called a “corpus.” The language used in the TOEFL iBT test closely reflects what is used in everyday academic settings.
This ensures your applicants are equipped with the skills students need in a higher education classroom. Students who score well on the TOEFL iBT test are prepared for success at your institution and to go further in their careers.

Know how well candidates use English

The TOEFL iBT test uses integrated tasks to measure all 4 skills students need to communicate: reading, listening, speaking and writing. Students may read a passage, listen to a lecture, assimilate what they have learned and then speak or write just as they do in a classroom.
The TOEFL iBT test uses 6 different tasks to simulate and assess real academic speaking demands and provides test takers with feedback on 3 aspects of academic speaking proficiency:

  • academic course content
  • campus situations
  • familiar topics

Structure of the TOEFL iBT:

Section

Description

Testing Time

Questions

Score Scale

Reading

3-5 passages from academic texts; approximately 700 words long; 12-14 questions per passage.

60-100 minutes

36-70 questions

0-30

Listening

4-6 lectures, some with classroom discussion; each 3-5 minutes long; 6 questions each. 2-3 conversations; each 3 minutes long; 5 questions each.

60-90 minutes

34-51 questions

0-30

Break

10 minutes

Speaking

2 tasks to express an opinion on a familiar topic; 4 tasks to speak based on what is read and listened to.

20 minutes

6 tasks

0-4 points converted to 0-30 score scale

Writing

1 task to write based on what is read and listened to; 1 task to support an opinion on a topic.

50 minutes

2 tasks

0-5 points converted to 0-30 score scale

Total score

0-120

If you are planning to study abroad, the TOEFL test is the one test that can take you anywhere.
In fact, more institutions accept TOEFL test scores than any other test scores in the world — more than 7,000 colleges, universities and licensing agencies in more than 130 countries,

GRE (GRADUATE RECORD EXAMINATION):

The GRE® General Test measures verbal reasoning, quantitative reasoning, critical thinking and analytical writing skills that are not related to any specific field of study.
Verbal Reasoning — The skills measured include the test taker’s ability to:

  • analyze and evaluate written material and synthesize information obtained from it
  • analyze relationships among component parts of sentences
  • recognize relationships between words and concepts

Quantitative Reasoning — The skills measured include the test taker’s ability to:

  • understand basic concepts of arithmetic, algebra, geometry and data analysis
  • reason quantitatively
  • solve problems in a quantitative setting

Analytical Writing — The skills measured include the test taker’s ability to:

  • articulate complex ideas clearly and effectively
  • examine claims and accompanying evidence
  • support ideas with relevant reasons and examples
  • sustain a well-focused, coherent discussion
  • control the elements of standard written English

Prospective graduate applicants take the General Test. GRE test scores are used by admissions or fellowship panels to supplement undergraduate records and other qualifications for graduate study. The scores provide common measures for comparing the qualifications of applicants and aid in evaluating grades and recommendations

Computer-based General Test Content and Structure

The computer-based General Test is composed of Verbal Reasoning, Quantitative Reasoning and Analytical Writing sections. In addition, one unidentified unscored section may be included, and this section can appear in any position in the test after the Analytical Writing Section. Questions in the unscored section are being tested for possible use in future tests, and answers will not count toward your scores.
Total testing time is up to three hours, not including the research section. The directions at the beginning of each section specify the total number of questions in the section and the time allowed for the section.
The Analytical Writing section is always first. For the Issue task, two topics will be presented and you will choose one. The Argument task does not present a choice of topics; instead, one topic will be presented.
The Verbal and Quantitative sections may appear in any order, including an unidentified unscored section. Treat each section presented during your test as if it counts.

Typical Computer-based GRE® General Test

Section

Number of Questions

Time

Analytical Writing

1 Issue Task*

45 minutes

Analytical Writing

1 Argument Task*

30 minutes

Verbal

30

30 minutes

Quantitative

28

45 minutes

Unscored**

Varies

Varies

Research***

Varies

Varies

* For the Issue task, two essay topics are presented and you choose one. The Argument task does not present a choice of topics; instead one topic is presented.
** An unidentified unscored section may be included and may appear in any order after the Analytical Writing section. It is not counted as part of your score.
*** An identified research section that is not scored may be included, and it is always at the end of the test.

Paper-based General Test Content and Structure:

The paper-based General Test is composed of Verbal Reasoning, Quantitative Reasoning and Analytical Writing sections. In addition, one unidentified unscored section may be included, and this section can appear in any position in the test after the Analytical Writing Section. Questions in the unscored section are being tested for possible use in future tests, and answers will not count toward your scores.
Total testing time is up to 3-3/4 hours. The directions at the beginning of each section specify the total number of questions in the section and the time allowed for the section.
The Analytical Writing section is always first. For the Issue task, two topics will be presented and you will choose one. The Argument task does not present a choice of topics; instead one topic will be presented.
The Verbal and Quantitative sections may appear in any order, including an unidentified Verbal or Quantitative unscored section. Treat each section presented during your test as if it counts.

Typical Paper-based General Test:

Section

Number of Questions

Time

Analytical Writing

1 Issue Task*

45 minutes

Analytical Writing

1 Argument Task*

30 minutes

Verbal (2 sections)

38 per section

30 minutes per section

Quantitative (2 sections)

30 per section

30 minutes per section

Unscored**

Varies

30 minutes

*For the Issue task, two essay topics will be presented and you will choose one. The Argument task does not present a choice of topics; instead, one topic will be presented.
** An unidentified unscored section may be included and may appear in any order after the Analytical Writing section. It is not counted as part of your score

GMAT (GRADUATE MANAGEMENT ADMISSION TEST):

The Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) is a Standardized test that measures verbal, mathematical and analytical writing skills. It is intended to help the graduate schools of business assess the potential of applicants for advanced study in business and management.

Nearly 900 management institutes all over the world (almost all of them in the US) require GMAT scores from each applicant for admission to the MBA program.
The GMAT tests the fundamental skills – Reasoning and Comprehension included – and does not require any subject-specific theoretical study.

The GMAT test is developed and administered by the US-based Pearson VUE under the direction of the Graduate Management Admission Council (GMAC), a non-profit organization of graduate business schools worldwide. This implies that Pearson VUE conducts the test, and sends each examinee the score report. For the conduct of the test, Pearson VUE has appointed testing centers in various countries.

Unlike other exams, you can choose your own date and time for taking the GMAT!
The test has three distinct sections: Analytical Writing Ability (AWA), Quantitative, and Verbal. The Quantitative section has two types of questions, Problem Solving and Data Sufficiency, mingled throughout the section. The Verbal Section has three types: Sentence Correction, Critical Reasoning, and Reading Comprehension; here too, the questions of each type appear in no set sequence. There are a total of 78 questions, 37 in Quantitative and 41 in Verbal. These have to be done in 75 minutes each.
The following table gives out the format of the GMAT-CAT:

Questions

Timing

Computer Tutorial

NA

NA

Analysis of an Issue
Analysis of an Argument

1Topic
1 Topic

30min.
30 min.

Optional Rest Break

NA

5 min.

Quantitative (Problem Solving & Data Sufficiency)

37

75 min.

Optional Rest Break

NA

5 min.

Verbal (Reading Comprehension, Critical Reasoning, & Sentence Correction)

41

75 min.

78+2 Essays>

4hrs.(approx.)

The tutorial is meant to make you feel comfortable with the infrastructure and the environment and does not have a prescribed time limit. You are expected to be through with it in 15 minutes or so : it makes sense to acclimatize yourself fully with the setting even after you think you have understood how the system works.

ANALYTICAL WRITING SECTION:
The analytical writing section requires you to write – or rather type – two short essays in thirty minutes each. The first is the Analysis of an Issue, in which you need to analyze the issue presented and explain your views on it. The second essay is Analysis of an Argument, in which a given argument has to be critically analyzed and evaluated.

For both the essays, the emphasis is on the “Analytical” part, and not on the “Writing” part. This implies that a concise essay with well-reasoned points written in simple English will be looked upon more favourably than an essay which falls short on the analytical aspects even though it is high on writing skills.

A five-minute break follows the two essays. The computer gives you the option to take this break, or to move directly to the subsequent section. Even if you finish the essays before the stipulated sixty minutes, the break will still be of five minutes. It is advisable to utilize this break by gearing yourself up for the tougher sections that follow.

QUANTATIVE SECTION
The 37 questions in this section comprise two kinds of questions: Problem Solving (PS) and Data Sufficiency (DS). The two kinds do not have a definite break-up; usually there are around 20 PS and 17 DS questions. The section tests you on a level of Maths that is comparable to the level of Class 10 exams, with questions on Number Systems, Percentages, Fractions & Decimals, Algebra (including Quadratic Equations), Geometry (including Basic Coordinate Geometry), Ratio & Proportion, Area & Volume of 2-D and 3-D figures, and Probability. This list is not exhaustive; questions from beyond these topics may also be asked.

While the Problem Solving questions require you to solve a mathematical problem directly and choose the right answer, the Data Sufficiency is of a trickier variety. Each problem comprises a question followed by two statements, which may or may not lead to the answer to the given question. This is what you need to ascertain – whether the given statements can be used to answer the question or not, and if so, whether the statements can be used independently or in conjunction. Each of the five answers options present the five possibilities that arise in this case, and you have to apply the basic principles of mathematics with a strong dose of logic to get these right.

VERBAL SECTION:
The verbal section in GMAT test requires the basic skills of correct English coupled with reasoning and analysis. The 41 questions, to be attempted in 75 minutes, consist of three types : Sentence Correction (SC), Critical Reasoning (CR), and Reading Comprehension (RC). The three types are intermingled, with no fixed number for each type. The break-up of questions among SC, CR, and RC could be 14-14-13 or 15-13-13, or any such combination.

SCORING THE GMAT TEST
The two major parts of the test are scored independently. You will receive a verbal score (0 to 60) and a math score (0 to 60). You will also receive a total score (200 to 800), and a writing score (0 to 6). The average total score is 500.

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